Netflix Reviews

A place where you can see what my personal mind thinks about the movie selection on Netflix.
Most days I don't give any of the films any mind, however with this new "Get the Max from Netflix" I've found a few films that actually aren't so bad. And here are my personal opinions.
Genre Movie Title Cast Directors Writers
Shout
Cast: John Travolta, Jamie Walters, Heather Graham, and Richard JordanDirector: Jeffrey HornadayWriter: Joe GaytonPlot Summary According to IMDB: A new music teacher in a 1955 West Texas home for wayward boys brings new vision and hope for many of the interned boys.Genre: Drama, MusicalRated: PG-13
Starting this movie I had high hopes for it. Not only did it have John Travolta, but a very young Heather Graham as well. Not to mention it being set in an era where The Blues and Rock and Roll were just being discovered. The best years of real rock and roll in my opinion, when blues were something defined as dangerous and wrong. My high hopes continued on, even during the very spotty sounds. Yes, sadly, you will be having a long gruesome war with the volume buttons, but if you’re like me and can look past such flaws, you will most likely still enjoy the movie. I mean, it’s got blues AND John Travolta, if that isn’t incentive enough, then I may be a little afraid of you.
 IMDB classified this movie as a musical, but I don’t see how. It doesn’t fit your typical description of a musical where everyone is blasting out their emotions through song and dance every five seconds. It just has some damn good music. 
The story behind the movie itself is well…hidden behind the romantic drama of it all. Or maybe that was the story…it’s truly hard to tell in the movie because you’re simply too entertained with what is going on in everyone’s individual plot that the main focus of the actual story is kind of lost on you. It’s the kind of movie where each person that watches it will find a different story to share in it.
What I love about the film is how accurate all of the opinion on rock and roll are during that time period. A specific scene to relate to that doesn’t give away any plot is one in a church, where you hear a man preaching about the sins all around everyone, and him asking all of those listening to reject such things, and especially the words and sin in the music coming out ‘now-a-days’. 

Overall a very interesting film, one that kept my attention for the whole movie, which truthfully is quite hard for me to do. Get the popcorn ready ahead of time, and keep everything you need when you watch a movie by you at all times, because if you’re like me, any interruption will annoy you to no end. 
Would I Recommend This: Hell Yes

Shout

Cast: John Travolta, Jamie Walters, Heather Graham, and Richard Jordan
Director: Jeffrey Hornaday
Writer: Joe Gayton
Plot Summary According to IMDB: A new music teacher in a 1955 West Texas home for wayward boys brings new vision and hope for many of the interned boys.
Genre: Drama, Musical
Rated: PG-13

Starting this movie I had high hopes for it. Not only did it have John Travolta, but a very young Heather Graham as well. Not to mention it being set in an era where The Blues and Rock and Roll were just being discovered. The best years of real rock and roll in my opinion, when blues were something defined as dangerous and wrong. My high hopes continued on, even during the very spotty sounds. Yes, sadly, you will be having a long gruesome war with the volume buttons, but if you’re like me and can look past such flaws, you will most likely still enjoy the movie. I mean, it’s got blues AND John Travolta, if that isn’t incentive enough, then I may be a little afraid of you.

 IMDB classified this movie as a musical, but I don’t see how. It doesn’t fit your typical description of a musical where everyone is blasting out their emotions through song and dance every five seconds. It just has some damn good music.

The story behind the movie itself is well…hidden behind the romantic drama of it all. Or maybe that was the story…it’s truly hard to tell in the movie because you’re simply too entertained with what is going on in everyone’s individual plot that the main focus of the actual story is kind of lost on you. It’s the kind of movie where each person that watches it will find a different story to share in it.

What I love about the film is how accurate all of the opinion on rock and roll are during that time period. A specific scene to relate to that doesn’t give away any plot is one in a church, where you hear a man preaching about the sins all around everyone, and him asking all of those listening to reject such things, and especially the words and sin in the music coming out ‘now-a-days’.

Overall a very interesting film, one that kept my attention for the whole movie, which truthfully is quite hard for me to do. Get the popcorn ready ahead of time, and keep everything you need when you watch a movie by you at all times, because if you’re like me, any interruption will annoy you to no end. 

Would I Recommend This: Hell Yes

The Skeleton Key
Cast: Kate Hudson, Joy Bryant, Gena Rowlands, and Peter SarsgaardDirector: Iain SoftleyWriter: Ehren KrugerRelease Date: August 12th, 2005Genre: Drama, Mystert, ThrillerRun Time: 1 hour and 44 minutesRated: PG-13
When Netflix recommended this, I honestly didn’t know what to expect. But the moment I heard Kate Hudson, I couldn’t stop myself from hitting play. I have yet to watch a movie with her in it that I didn’t like. She may not be the most amazing actress on the face of the planet, but she is talented, and gorgeous, and well, because of that I’m pretty biased. 
In the film you find yourself not trusting anyone right from the get go, or maybe that was just me. Either way, everyone seems a little bit suspicious outside of the oh so pretty Kate Hudson. Her empathy is shown right from the get go, giving her the perfect heroine views. A hospice worker that has seen enough of the depressing cases of those that pass and have family that no longer want to be a part of their lives, Caroline (Kate Hudson), decides to take a job caring for an old man named Ben that suffered from a stroke. And like a true stereotypical white girl in a horror/suspense film, her suspicious spike just a day or so of working at the house. Due to her suspicions, and a skeleton key given to her by the cold wife of Ben, Caroline opens a door full of things she can only immediately relate to Voo-Doo. When asked, Violet says she’s never been in the room, even though that was the room her husband had a stroke in.
Now much too curious for her own good, Caroline is desperate to unlock the secrets of the house, and save Ben from the troubles held with it.
Now, the cover of the movie itself isn’t all that enticing (to me anyways). Even the first few minutes are quite boring and move slowly but it does set up the main character and her past quite well. It’s nothing compared to the intro to Paranormal Activity. 
The director (Iain Softley) of course chose Louisana, the state known most for the spooky voo-doo religion, as his main setting. And personally I feel did very well in handling the different views on such a touchy topic for most people. It shows the skeptism and transition into belief far better than your typical supernatural horror film and the scare factor (while yes is very low) isn’t filled with cheesy pop outs outside of one small scene. Iain seems to get that it’s all about the way you set up a scene rather than the way you scare the audience. Most use music as a way to tell their audience how to feel, and while the movie does use this trick as well, I almost didn’t even recognize any sound outside of what was going on. Just low-key enough to enjoy the movie without making you constantly fear what’s around the corner. 
For some, they might find that boring, but for me, it’s perfection. It’s the exact way I feel most films should portray their scenes. Just enough music and let the audience decide if they’re scared or not.
As far as the cast goes, I was surprised and very pleased. They all worked very well together, and Gena Rowlands (Violet) made a perfectly eerie old woman. The kind you’d picture in most horror stories told by a camp fire. There’s just enough acting chemistry between each and every member that you’re really not sure who is on who’s side and who is telling the truth.

With multiple twists and turns, a great cast, a plot I have not seen done before, The Skeleton Key was definitely a movie I’d watch again. So thanks, Netflix. Maybe there’s more to your movie selection than I thought.
Would I Recommend This: Yes

The Skeleton Key

Cast: Kate Hudson, Joy Bryant, Gena Rowlands, and Peter Sarsgaard
Director: Iain Softley
Writer: Ehren Kruger
Release Date: August 12th, 2005
Genre: Drama, Mystert, Thriller
Run Time: 1 hour and 44 minutes
Rated: PG-13

When Netflix recommended this, I honestly didn’t know what to expect. But the moment I heard Kate Hudson, I couldn’t stop myself from hitting play. I have yet to watch a movie with her in it that I didn’t like. She may not be the most amazing actress on the face of the planet, but she is talented, and gorgeous, and well, because of that I’m pretty biased.

In the film you find yourself not trusting anyone right from the get go, or maybe that was just me. Either way, everyone seems a little bit suspicious outside of the oh so pretty Kate Hudson. Her empathy is shown right from the get go, giving her the perfect heroine views. A hospice worker that has seen enough of the depressing cases of those that pass and have family that no longer want to be a part of their lives, Caroline (Kate Hudson), decides to take a job caring for an old man named Ben that suffered from a stroke. And like a true stereotypical white girl in a horror/suspense film, her suspicious spike just a day or so of working at the house. Due to her suspicions, and a skeleton key given to her by the cold wife of Ben, Caroline opens a door full of things she can only immediately relate to Voo-Doo. When asked, Violet says she’s never been in the room, even though that was the room her husband had a stroke in.

Now much too curious for her own good, Caroline is desperate to unlock the secrets of the house, and save Ben from the troubles held with it.

Now, the cover of the movie itself isn’t all that enticing (to me anyways). Even the first few minutes are quite boring and move slowly but it does set up the main character and her past quite well. It’s nothing compared to the intro to Paranormal Activity.

The director (Iain Softley) of course chose Louisana, the state known most for the spooky voo-doo religion, as his main setting. And personally I feel did very well in handling the different views on such a touchy topic for most people. It shows the skeptism and transition into belief far better than your typical supernatural horror film and the scare factor (while yes is very low) isn’t filled with cheesy pop outs outside of one small scene. Iain seems to get that it’s all about the way you set up a scene rather than the way you scare the audience. Most use music as a way to tell their audience how to feel, and while the movie does use this trick as well, I almost didn’t even recognize any sound outside of what was going on. Just low-key enough to enjoy the movie without making you constantly fear what’s around the corner.

For some, they might find that boring, but for me, it’s perfection. It’s the exact way I feel most films should portray their scenes. Just enough music and let the audience decide if they’re scared or not.

As far as the cast goes, I was surprised and very pleased. They all worked very well together, and Gena Rowlands (Violet) made a perfectly eerie old woman. The kind you’d picture in most horror stories told by a camp fire. There’s just enough acting chemistry between each and every member that you’re really not sure who is on who’s side and who is telling the truth.

With multiple twists and turns, a great cast, a plot I have not seen done before, The Skeleton Key was definitely a movie I’d watch again. So thanks, Netflix. Maybe there’s more to your movie selection than I thought.

Would I Recommend This: Yes

Welcome One, Welcome All!

Due to a severe lack of interest in almost ALL of the movies I see on Netflix, and the fact that there is now the whole ‘Get the Max from Netflix’ option, I have decided to save many of you all (at my own sacrifice) time and go ahead and watch what is recommended to me. Not everyone will like what I have to say and you all have your right to your opinion! But know if it differs from mine I will cut you.

Just kidding.

Kind of.

Either way! I hope you like my reviews, or even disagree with them and are capable of having an intellectual debate over our differing opinions. 

I’ll let you all in on a little bit about me; I like movies that have to do with Ghosts the most, sadly there are not many good films out there relating to it. Ever. At least not that I’ve seen on Netflix. I did not enjoy Paranormal Activity as much as others in the context of a horror film but I did enjoy it as a comedy.

I used to like the show Glee and now I hate it.

I lvoe all music and Tim Burton is my favorite director of all time. The dream team of Tim Burton, Danny Elfman and Johnny Dept will almost ALWAYS get me to sit down and watch a film, even if it got shitty reviews.

Anddd that’s all of the information that NONE of you really needed to know. 

On to starting the reviews!

Oh, one more thing, I’m an ammatuer. I don’t claim to do this as a profession and I watch the movies on my time because I do have a life outside of the compu- LMAO couldn’t even finish that. But I don’t promise a steady flow of reviews because I may actually not have time for whatever reason. The gates of hell opening up, the sky falling, who knows. 

Okay, NOW on to the reviews.